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20130801
20130831
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
telling nbc they don't know the scope of the information that snowden took. the paper revealing the nsa can tap more than 75%, three-fourths of internet traffic in the country. jim miklaszewski is joining me now to explain what happened in court and how this will play out. as we stated the appeal process is something that is automatic. >> absolutely. >> reporter: the military judge did hand down a 35-year prison term for fpc bradley manning for leaking 700,000 documents. a pretty massive leak of intelligence. the largest in u.s. history. the prosecution had asked for 60 years. the defense had asked for 25 years. and the maximum sentence would have been 90. some are already looking at this as somewhat of a win for bradley manning and his defense team. now, the judge had already ordered, prior to the sentence, that he would be given credit for the 3 1/2 years he has already spent in custody, so that already reduces the sentence. and so at the -- a little over ten years, he would be eligible for parole. that is a big wild card because who knows what the sense of bradley manning's offenses
new guidelines to make government surveillance more transparent. former cia and nsa director michael hayden noted today that the president never actually said anything had been done wrong. >> to me, the most telling thing she said was perhaps something he didn't quite say. he didn't suggest he was going to operationally change this program. i mean, there's no suggestion that what he was doing, and what president bush was doing before him with regard to these programs was anything other than lawful, effective and appropriate. >> on "meet the press," republican iowa congressman steve king stood by his comments about immigrants he made last month, saying that his remarks about drug smugglers outnumbering valedictorians were accurate and new legislation granting the shorter path to citizenship would not differentiate between the two groups. >> my heart goes out to the valedictorians brought here by their parents. but we cannot put our sympathies for people in that condition greater than our love for the rule of law, or the sovereignty of the united states of america. >> the conservative
by nsa surveillance. i think the report in "the washington post" showing that there were more than 2700 incidents in which the nsa broke and violated is going to get more press. democrats are already reacting negatively to it. we've seen patrick leahy on the senate judiciary saying that he's going to hold hearings. even nancy pelosi who has been supportive of the president here says she's quite troubled and regular critics like senator ron wyden have released a letter saying this is the only the tip of the iceberg. there's still a lot we don't know. >> harry, what are you hearing down there? is this something that has already got the far left up in arms or much to do about nothing? >> they voted to defund this program a month ago. i think you're going to have real issues when the congress gets back. there's been a lot of pushback. you can see the people that supported the president, kind of pulling back. this is going to be a big issue. if you you're looking for the obama scandal, as the republicans are, this is going to be a big issue. >> nsa? >> nsa. >> christine, what's your headline
latest on the nsa leaker and his life ahead. >> hi, there, mara. edward snowden has, it would appear, settled into his new russian life as quietly as he spent most of his almost six weeks ined is that transit zone inside moscow's airport. so quiet, in fact, that some paparazzi and journalists who were apparently stalking him all that time are calling it anticlimatic. the only information we're actually getting about snowden is coming from his lawyer anatoly kucherena. he found a place to stay, an undisclosed location in moscow. he is keen to learn the russian language and culture and looking, according to kucherena, for a job as a human rights activist. he's also giving up, apparently, on the idea of seeking asylum in any latin american country. that means that he's probably taking the advice of his father, lonnie snowden who told me in an interview we did on thursday from washington, d.c., that if he were his son, he would stay here in russia and make a life of it because it's a strong country, he said, that could resist extreme u.s. pressure to actually to hand his son over to face
and is not different from our concerns about the nsa. it is not different from our concerns about the racial profiling. and now the idea that simply because of someone's class status which is what we're talking about here means you should be fingerprinted and that, just saying we want to do this for the record, we want to do this to prevent crime. he is making a presumption poor people should be kept as a kind of preemptive device so we know eventually you will commit crime and we'll have you on the record then. so it goes against the presumption of innocence. it goes against the 4th amendment and is really stunning he was able to stand up and make that statement. >> my guests, a big thanks to both of you for being with me. don't forget new york police commissioner ray kelly will be david gregory's guest tomorrow on nbc's "meet the press." check your local listings. >>> a witness to history. the fight for civil rights told through the eyes of a black butler in the white house. we are going to talk to the journalist whose reporting inspired the movie and best selling book. >> wow. amazing. thank you so
apparently are supportive of some action at this point, but if you recall, the nsa funding vote, do you remember the justin conners vote a couple weeks ago where they came close to passing a bill that would be taking money away on the nsa surveillance, and it was a phreut on both parties on the bill, and very narrowly it got defeated. that's a way to look at how the vote on syria will go. you will see the republicans and the liberal wing of the democratic party, and the isolationist wing of the republican party, they were on the losing side, but boy did they come close and they got 200 plus votes. >> chuck, it would seem to me that this is not just going to be a vote on military action in syria. this is in a lot of ways going to be a vote on america's role in the world moving forward. no? >> that's right. should america play the world's police officer, right? are we the ones in charge of deciding when an international law is broken, like assad did with the chemical weapons, since there is no other country willing to step up, is this the role of the united states? it's the role the unite
to reform the nsa program, great. but if you want to gut it, you make us much less safe, and you're putting our nation at risk. we need to have policies in place that can deal with the threats that exist, and they are real and they are growing. >> is it too early to be politicizing this, or is this exactly the right time to say, hey, this is what these programs are for? >> it's the right time to do so. the issue's been out there for a long time now. there's no question that the programs are in place for a while. intelligence has been around a long time. this shouldn't be news. it should not force our country to stop some of the forms of keeping our country safe. for us to say, there's a rogue idiot, snowden releases this information, we should not push back by stopping some of the programs that keep us safe. we should do the opposite. senator graham is right on point there. >> christine, we've been hearing for the last ten years how weakened al qaeda has become through our efforts against them. but then when you have something like this happening, does this cause the public to question whet
surveillance programs. plan that the president said was in the works before edward snowden leaked secret nsa documents to the press. >> there's no doubt that mr. snowden's leaks triggered a much more rapid and passionate response. i actually think we would have gotten to the same place and we would have done so without putting at risk our national security. >> nbc's kristen welker is live at martha's vineyard where the president is expected to arrive shortly. kristen, good to see you. >> reporter: good to see you, too, craig. >> what can we expect from president obama after his vacation? >> reporter: well, craig, i think you're going to hear a lot more about the nsa, as you heard the president say and as you just mentioned. he mapped out sort of his strategy moving forward, announced the fact that there need to be steps taken to enhance transparency of that controversial surveillance program. so he really started to enumerate what he wants to see happen, yesterday during that news conference, take a look at some of what he mapped out. working with congress to reform the nsa program that coll
in washington, especially from the president. on friday he announced a revamp to the nsa surveillance programs but denied it was a result of edward snowden and he spoke in a tv interview yesterday. i want to play what he had to say. >> at this point, what i would like is for this to be vetted in open court for the american people to have all of the facts. what i've seen is much political theater. i was disappointed in the president's press conference. >> senator, do you think that edward snowden is winning the battle out there, the public perception of secrecy versus security, that the result of what he has done to expose all of this is worth it? >> the issue is not whether edward snowden is winning or losing and i would disagree that he is winning personally. i think he should be brought back for trial as both the president and his father seem to agree. the real question is how do we modify our intelligence structure so as to strike a better balance between preserving our scooter aecurity protecting our liberties? i welcome the president's embrace for what i made for a special advocate to pro
about the new report saying the nsa breaking privacy rules thousands of times each year since congress granted brand-new powers in '08. reports saying more than 2,700 times in a year according to an audit. last week the president had this to say. >> if you look at the reports, even the disclosures that mr. snowden has put forward, all of the stories that have been written, what you're not reading about is the government actually abusing these programs and listening in on people's phone calls or inappropriately reading people's e-mails. what you're hearing about is the prospect that these could be abused. >> within the last hour, patrick leahy expressed concern about the lack of straightforwardness and new reports coming out what is going on about american citizens. does this further damage the brand -- the american brand on the diplomatic stage? if the united states is so suspicious of its own people how can foreign nations concentrate we are not in an overreach mode? >> this is something you heard the president talk about last week. the secretary has spoken about. they are committed t
and fielding questions about the controversial nsa program. do you think the biggest onus is on the president and not having a government shutdown, especially tied to the date of october 1st when open enrollment begins for obama kaye? >> i think it is, in fact, a pivotal time relative to the issues as well. a shutdown could be catastrophic. i think we all appreciate that, both republicans and democrats. i think real opportunities for us to come together in the next few months. i think the fact that we are on our august recess, most of us are in our districts hearing from our constituents, there is big pushback on the nsa. there is actually a lot of applause about obama care and people are recognizing that, in fact, there is much to be lost if we don't allow obama care to move forward. for all of us, we are going to see that there is a limitation now on how much we will be spending both in terms of costs of our premiums and our drug costs. it will be capped at about $6,000 a year per person. that is a huge savings for people with chronic illness in particular. >> i got to ask you about what is
from glenn greenwald did a program that the nsa has been using. it's a complete conflict, a complete going back on his word and now we see snowden roaming free and is considered a russian citizen the next 12 months. >> it is a frustrating situation and the administration has put in a significant amount of energy in engaging russia. is there a crisis in syria and russia has been playing gobel l in preventing another nuclear iran. we have to make sure we don't lose our focus on these issues, but this is making it very difficult. it is as buck mckeown and the house has said it shows that it's a difficult relationship but, at the same time, it's one we have to navigate through. >> this adds a completely new layer to that. former state department officer, joel rubin, thank you. have a good weekend. >> thank you. >>> it is the first friday of the month. that means it's time to talk about the jobs numbers. we know that topic was a high point on the president's agenda this week. >> what is the message you're bringing to the hill today? >> jobs. middle class. growth. >> are some republicans t
at the g-20 in st. petersburg and move comes after russian authorities granted temporary asylum to nsa leaker edward snowden. it comes this after the president said this last noit in an interview with jay leno. >> i was disappointed because, you know, even though with we don't have an extradition treaty with them. they still help us on supplying our troops in afghanistan and still helping us on counterterrorism work and they were helpful after the boston bombing but there have been times where they slip back in the cold war thinking and a cold war mentality. >> kristen welker joining me from the white house. some people would interpret this as a diplomatic snub in advance or is this to get putin's attention and maybe things will reverse course by the time the g-20 happens in september? >> reporter: no doubt, thomas, this is a diplomatic snub but white house official say, look. there are other areas of agreement where they can work with russian president putin like afghanistan, for example. this is a diplomatic snub to be sure. the white house has been considering this for quite some ti
month during the g-20 taking place in st. petersburg. this was triggered by putin's decision to give nsa leaker edward snowden asylum in russia. for the white house it was the last straw in a series of diplomatic clashes between the countries. joining me now is josh ge rstein. you wrote the announcement was reminiscent of cold war era show downs. you said the u.s.-russia relationship is now so frosty that it department appear the two presidents would accomplish enough to merit a high profile meet ing. this is about more than just edward snowden. it seems like the biggest fissure between the leaders but there is more going on here. >> yeah. that is relationship that's become more difficult over time. it was successful early on. president obama hammered out a major arms control treaty pass bid the senate in 2010. this was the so-le called re set to change the relationship that had cropped up during the bush administration. since then it really has gone off the rails. probably the biggest irritant understates it to say the syria situation is really the biggest on oh stackbstacle in a situat
there will be questions about the relationship with russia, the nsa situation what are the extreme or limits what spying in the u.s. or spying in terms of data collection might include. and then things like the domestic agenda. it certainly had been the hope of the white house that before congress had left town in august that an immigration bill might be signed. well, the senate got that done but not the house. so what can they look forward to in the weeks and months ahead? can anything on that subject be done? of course, when congress does get back to town, the president will have to deal with them on issues like the budget, the debt ceiling. the president has made clear he doesn't want to negotiate on the debt ceiling so there are big issues still ahead. i think the most important things to look for are any new pieces of information about that threat level. is the president able to be a bit more exclusive about that and his own sense of the relationship between the u.s. and russia now. presidential news conferences are a great opportunity for news to be made. some of it big and in scope and sometimes
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)